Posts Tagged ‘ Urban Planning ’

Is Your City Design-Centered or Place-Centered? « Project for Public Spaces – Placemaking for Communities

To move toward an Architecture of Place, we must all advocate for our cities to take a Place-Centered approach to creating new buildings and public spaces. 

When an opportunity to develop a site in your city comes up, what kind of approach do the people leading the process take? Do they treat the site as an independent piece of real estate, to be interpreted by architects and planners first before involving any of the local residents? Or do they reach out to people to find out what needs already exist in the area around that site, and then begin devising a plan with the community?

We call the former of these two a Design-Centered approach, and the latter a Place-Centered approach. One of our 11 Placemaking Principles is that it is critical to remember, in any project, that you are creating a place, not a design. While good design is important to creating great places, it is but one tool in your kit–not the driving force behind good Placemaking. When a community is involved from (or even before) the start of a design process, that process serves the site and the people who will use it, instead of serving the designers’ own interests. This creates places that are accessible, dynamic, and inclusive–the kind of places that are central to building strong neighborhoods and cities.

via Is Your City Design-Centered or Place-Centered? « Project for Public Spaces – Placemaking for Communities.

TheWashCycle: 11th Street Recreation Bridge

One of the illustrations of the 11th Street Bridge by Ed Estes, has received a lot of attention and is being blogged on several popular sites in Washington, DC. Ed’s conceptual designs and illustrations are part of the 11th Street Recreation Bridge Potential Study published by the DC Office of Planning.

I called it! Sort of. Back in 2009 when DDOT held a presser to start work on the 11th Street Bridge I wrote When I asked about the upstream span and the possibility of repurposing it, I was told that DDOT had not ruled that out yet. That would be a great idea. DC would save the cost of demolition and could put that towards maintenance – which would be less without car traffic. Then they could give it the High Line treatment, creating a space with plantings, art etc.. And cyclists could use that part too.

via TheWashCycle: 11th Street Recreation Bridge.

Advertising Misinformation: How to Fake a Business District | Design + Ideas on WU

When a city’s economy begins to fail, those in charge have some choices to make. Should they pump money into local businesses? Should they let the public see just how bad it’s getting? One town in England is taking a novel approach to the scores of closed-up shops on its main street: they’re putting up fake business fronts to make the shopping areas seem less deserted.

via Advertising Misinformation: How to Fake a Business District | Design + Ideas on WU.