Archive for the ‘ Adaptive Reuse ’ Category

An Interview With the Architect of DC’s Shipping Container Apartments

DC-based Travis Price recently made headlines for being the architect behind the shipping container apartments that popped up in northeast DC last month. But the architect has long had an outside-the-box philosophy when it comes to architectural design, and in DC, that started in Forest Hills where the homes he designed, including his own, stand out among the neighborhood’s brick colonials. UrbanTurf recently chatted with the poetic Price about the state of DC architecture, the trend of super-small living and this idea he has for floating homes on the Potomac.

via An Interview With the Architect of DC’s Shipping Container Apartments.

Architects unveil four bold visions for 11th Street Bridge Park – The Washington Post

The subject of Washington’s buzziest architecture competition isn’t a Smithsonian museum or a downtown office building, but a series of concrete piers jutting out of the Anacostia River a dozen blocks east of Nationals Park.

More than 40 architecture teams comprised of 82 firms initially expressed interested in designing a park traversing the Anacostia  – what could become a local version of New York’s High Line Park — atop piers that held up the old 11th Street Bridge before it was replaced.

The four finalists submitted their proposals to the project’s organizers Tuesday, and they leave nothing to the imagination: there are amphitheaters, education centers, dining piers, urban gardens, waterfalls, climbing walls and an array of eye-catching architectural features, any of which could transform the old bridge site into a distinctive landmark.

Scott Kratz, director of the 11th Street Bridge Park, said the project has the chance to bring needed attention to a river that has suffered environmentally and long served as a barrier between the majority of the city and some of its poorest communities. He said he was thrilled at the quality of responses.

“These are some of the best designers in the world and their work reflects that,” he said. “We were hoping that the proposals would not just be shades of gray and we received reds and blues and greens and purples. They are all so different while still responding to the community’s vision.

”The teams will come to Washington to present their ideas to a jury of experts in design, architecture, health and economic development on Sept. 29-30 and a final decision is expected Oct. 16.

via Architects unveil four bold visions for 11th Street Bridge Park – The Washington Post.

2 | Brazil’s World Cup Stadiums Reimagined As Sorely Needed Housing

2 | Brazil's World Cup Stadiums Reimagined As Sorely Needed Housing | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

 

What happens to all the World Cup stadiums now that the big event is over? Brazil spent around $4 billion on the stadiums used this year, including four new stadiums that are unlikely to ever see much action again. In Brasilia, a $900 million stadium has 72,000 seats, but local football teams will probably draw crowds less than a tenth of that size. In the heart of the Amazon rainforest, a little-used stadium will cost $250,000 a month just to maintain.

via 2 | Brazil’s World Cup Stadiums Reimagined As Sorely Needed Housing | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

Conceptual Fly-through of the 11th Street Bridge

Using state of the art software, engineers at Autodesk created this visualization of where the future 11th Street Bridge Park will sit across the Anacostia River.

Based on that feedback, the talented engineers at the software company Autodesk created a visualization of the future 11th Street Bridge Park and even incorporated some of the community generated concepts. While the final design will look much different as we go through a nation-wide design competition (this rendering shows a simple flat span) this fly through video dramatically captures size, scale and location.

Read more…

Altered Architecture: 12 More Abandoned Buildings as Art | Urbanist

Abandoned places are brightened up, made even creepier and more atmospheric, or otherwise transformed into massive works of art with installations that use entire buildings as creative tools. Whether calling attention to blight in urban areas or making use of a structure before it’s demolished, these 12 more! abandoned building art projects make already-fascinating spaces even more of a visual delight

via Altered Architecture: 12 More Abandoned Buildings as Art | Urbanist.

The McMillan redevelopment plan in DC

There are miles to go before ground is broken, but plans for the redevelopment of the McMillan Sand Filtration Site took a significant step forward Thursday when plans won the provisional approval of the District’s Historic Preservation Review Board.

The site, at North Capitol Street and Michigan Avenue NW, functioned as a water-filtration plant until the 1980s and has been eyed for redevelopment almost since the day it closed. The most recent effort has been underway since 2006, when a city commission selected a group of developers known as Vision McMillan Partners to begin exploring redevelopment options. Under its current arrangement with the city, VMP is now embarking on the process of preparing the land for development in exchange for the first right to purchase the land once that “entitlement” process is complete.

11th Street Bridge Park Concept Sketches praised